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Michael Strickland  * Lab PI

Michael Strickland * Lab PI

 

Michael Strickland

mstrickland@uidaho.edu

I'm an assistant professor at the University of Idaho, father, husband, former Missouri farm boy, and Army Vet. I love to explore the relationship between soil microbial communities and ecosystem processes. Ultimately, I want to understand how this relationship impacts the way we manage soils. 

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Jane Lucas  * Postdoc

Jane Lucas * Postdoc

 

Jane Lucas

janelucas@uidaho.edu

I am a postdoctoral researcher exploring microbial and invertebrate communities at the University of Idaho. In collaboration with Dr. Strickland, we are examining a variety of topics, from herbivore/plant/microbial interactions to the ecological impacts of agricultural antibiotic use. Through my research I hope to shed light on what factors drive community structure in belowground environments. Ultimately, I strive to understand how these incredibly diverse communities influence the health and function of ecosystems and the organisms that inhabit them.

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Steven McBride  * Ph.D. Student

Steven McBride * Ph.D. Student

 

Steven McBride

mcbridsg@vt.edu

I am interested in how microbial community structure and function affect the carbon cycle. One of the main ways microbiaI communities do this is through the decomposition of leaf litter. I use lab and field based approaches to determine how resource history (dominant leaf litter) influences a community’s function. Furthermore, I am interested in how microbial communities interact with each other through chemical signaling and how they interact with higher trophic levels. This can involve small molecule signaling such as those used in quorum sensing, as well as volatile organic compounds (VOC) that can traverse the air filled pore spaces in soil. I am currently working on understanding how VOCs are consumed and produced during leaf litter decomposition.

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Peter Hoch  * M.S. Student

Peter Hoch * M.S. Student

 

Peter Hoch

hoch5094@vandals.uidaho.edu

My research interests include forest and soil ecology, specifically soil microbial ecology. I am currently pursuing a M.S. degree at the University of Idaho in Soil and Land resources. My current research is focused on the mechanisms which account for the microbial influence on leaf litter decomposition dynamics. Currently caring for two plants in a windowless office and proud former Yooper.

 
Bronte Sone * Ph.D. Student

Bronte Sone * Ph.D. Student

 

Bronte Sone

sone4469@vandals.uidaho.edu

I received my bachelors in sustainable agriculture from the University of Maine, and am currently a research assistant looking to earn a masters in soil and land resources. I am interested in looking at ways to quantify soil health, with a focus on soil microbial communities. I believe, with greater understanding of the processes within the soil, we can better manage our soils to help ameliorate the effects of climate change. It is my goal to develop a deeper understanding of the biological, chemical, and physical mechanisms within the soil that contribute to soil health.

 
Dan Du * Ph.D. Student

Dan Du * Ph.D. Student

Dan Du

dandu@uidaho.edu

I am a Hoosier transplanted in Idaho to pursue a Ph.D. in Soil and Land Resources. I have broad research interests in ecosystem ecology and services, soil ecology, and science outreach. More specifically, I am interested in the role of soil microbes as a driver of soil organic matter formation and the consequences of anthropogenic activity such as the effect of antibiotic deposition on soil microbial communities and ecosystem processes.

 
Katelyn Conery * Undergrad researcher, soon to be M.S. Student

Katelyn Conery * Undergrad researcher, soon to be M.S. Student

 

Katelyn Conery

cone2910@vandals.uidaho.edu

I am currently an undergraduate studying biochemistry and will be transitioning into the Masters program in Environmental Science in the spring. My research interests are diverse but include the effects of prescribed fire and wildfire on the soil microbial communities. The health and composition of soil microbial communities is one way to determine forest health which is affected by fire. I hope to create a research project that ties all of these components together and provides beneficial data in determining forest health. 

 

Lab alumni:

Carl Wepking  * Ph.D., Global Soil Biodiversity Institute

Carl Wepking * Ph.D., Global Soil Biodiversity Institute

 

Carl Wepking

I am interested in community and ecosystem ecology, ecosystem services, and sustainable agriculture. More specifically, I am interested in soil ecology and the relationships between soil organisms and their environment and the effect these relationships have on soil fertility, productivity and function. I am currently exploring the effect of residual antibiotics in dairy cattle manure on soil microbial communities.

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Interested in joining the lab: