INTERACTIONS BETWEEN ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE IN SOIL MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES AND COUPLED ELEMENTAL CYCLES

Antibiotic usage is widespread in the livestock industry and this has recently raised concerns because of its potential to increase the prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes in the environment. While this may have direct consequences for human health and well-being, exposure to antibiotics is also likely to lead to change in the soil microbial community and the ecosystem processes that these communities regulate, such as carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous cycling. Through funding from the USDA, we are examining the linkage between antibiotics, microbial communities, and elemental cycles using a stress-physiology framework.

Carl working at the S.C.A.R.E. (Soil Carbon Antibiotic Resistance Experiment) site, where we are tracking the cycling of carbon and nitrogen when soils are exposed to antibiotic free manure or manure from cattle given one of two types of antibiotics.  

Carl working at the S.C.A.R.E. (Soil Carbon Antibiotic Resistance Experiment) site, where we are tracking the cycling of carbon and nitrogen when soils are exposed to antibiotic free manure or manure from cattle given one of two types of antibiotics.  

Josh, Steve, and Steffany processing samples during a stable isotope pulse-chase at the S.C.A.R.E. site.

Josh, Steve, and Steffany processing samples during a stable isotope pulse-chase at the S.C.A.R.E. site.

 
 
This research is supported by Agricultural and Food Research Competitive grant no. 2013-67019-21363 from the USDA-NIFA.